Aug 13, 2020  
2020-2021 Undergraduate & Graduate Catalog 
  
2020-2021 Undergraduate & Graduate Catalog

Appendices


  • Appendix A Policies
  • Appendix B Maryland Admissions Requirements/Policy on Student Classification for Admission and Tuition Purposes
  • Appendix C General Education: Student Learning Principles and Goals
  • Appendix D Fulton School Curriculum Reform: Course Enhancement Menu
  • Appendix E Fulton School 102-Level Foreign Language Requirement for Select Majors
  • Appendix F Henson School of Science and Technology Course Repeat Policy

Appendix A

Students may locate the following policies in their respective publications by referring to the table of contents/index.

Policy that Appears in Code of Maryland Regulations:

Maryland Higher Education Commission Student Transfer Policy

Policies that Are Published and Distributed Electronically in Compliance with the Drug-Free Campus, Drug-Free Workplace Legislation:

(Drug and Alchol Abuse Prevention Program)

Substance Abuse Policies and Sanctions for Students
Substance Abuse Policies and Sanctions for Employees
Alcohol Abuse Policy
Drug Abuse Policy
Drug-Free Workplace Policy

Policies that Appear in the Faculty Handbook:

(Faculty Handbook)

Academic Advising (9-2)
Academic Clemency (9-5)
Academic Misconduct (6-3)
Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity (4-2)
AIDS (4-8)
Alleged Arbitrary and Capricious Grading (6-12)
Classification of Undergraduate Students (9-7)
Classroom and Related Responsibilities of Faculty (10-2)
Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s Programs (8-8)
Community Service (9-7)
Confidentiality and Disclosure of Student Records (10-4)
Continuing Education (9-5)
Degree and Curricular Requirements (11-3)
Eligibility to Register (9-3)
Evaluation of Performance of Faculty (2-39)
Examination and Portfolio Assessment (9-5)
Misconduct/Scholarly Work (6-6)
Religious Observances (10-4)
Sexual Misconduct and Gender-Based Discrimination (4-4)
Student Request for Waivers of Academic Policies (9-6)
Summer and Special Sessions (9-4)
Undergraduate Student Concurrent Inter-Institutional Registration (9-2)
Use of Facilities for Public Meetings (12-7)
Violence and Extremism (4-3)

Policies that Appear in the Student Code of Conduct, Policies and Procedures

(The Code of Conduct is found at www.salisbury.edu/studentconduct/code.html)

Academic Misconduct Policy
Alcohol and Other Drug Policy
Code of Conduct
Drug and Alcohol
Acceptable Use Policy
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
Academic Grievance Policy
Conduct System Policies and Procedures
Living on Campus Policies and Guidelines
Off-Campus Behavior
General Policies and Procedures
Fair Practices Policies
Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Policy
Reporting Sexual Offenses
Threats of Violence
Solicitation and Posting Policy
Tailgating Polices
Use of Facilities/Grounds for Meetings, Assemblies, Rallies, etc.

Policies that Appear in the Residence Hall Information Booklet:

(The booklet is found at www.salisbury.edu/housing.)

Early Arrivals
Electrical Appliances
Escort Policy
Facility Policies
Facility Repair Services
Fire Information
Fire, Security and Personal Safety
General Facility Policies and Information
Hall Design and Lifestyle
Handicap Accommodations
Housing/Residence Life Office Staff
Housing/ Residence Life Philosophy
Involvement and Activities
Maintenance Concerns
Meal Plans
Message from Housing/Residence Life
Personal Safety Tips
Refrigerators
Residence Hall Accommodations
Resident Students’ Rights and Responsibilities
Residents’ Policies and Information
Room Check-In
Room Check-Out
Room Furnishings
Room Inspections
Security
Smoking Policy
Spring Check-Out
Tack Strips
Toilet Stoppages
Use of Residence Halls by Guests
Vacations
Window and Door Displays

Policies that Appear in the Residence Halls Contract:

(The contract is found at www.salisbury.edu/housing.)

Access to Rooms
Assignment Policies and Procedures
Condition/Disability Influencing Assignment
Conditions of Residency
Contract Addendum for Chesapeake Hall and St. Martin Hall
Contract Addendum for Dogwood Village
Contract Termination by University
Damage Assessment
Duration of the Contract
Effective Dates
Eligibility for Residency
First-Time Residents
Housing Deposit Use and Refund
Loss of Property
Meal Plan Requirement
Petition for Release from Contract for Spring Semester
Provisions of Contract
Rates and Refunds
Refund Policy for Room Cost for Entire Semester
Reservation Procedures for Returning Residents
Residence Hall Philosophy
Returning Student Housings Options
Returning Students Seeking to Cancel Contract for Next Year
Room Changes
Room Reapplication Process
Search of Rooms
University Responsibility
Wait-listed Students
Winter Term and Summer Session Housing

Policies that Appear in the Student-Athlete Handbook:

Athlete Eligibility
Athletics Equipment
Class Attendance
Code of Conduct
Dress Code
Drug and Alcohol Policy
Drug Testing Policy
Inclement Weather Policy
Medical Procedures
Social Media Recommendations
Transfer Policy

Policies that Appear in the University Catalog:

Academic Clemency Policy
Admission Procedures

For High School Graduates
For Early Admissions
For Non-High School Graduates
For International Students
For Immigrant Students
For Veterans
For Transfer Students
For Former SU Students

Class Attendance
Equal Opportunity Policy
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
Graduation Requirements
Henson School Course Repeat Policy
Non-Traditional Credit Policies
Readmission
Student Residency Classification for Admission, Tuition and Charge Differential Purposes
Transfer of Credit from Other Institutions
Transfer Policies
Waivers of Academic Policies and Procedures
Withdrawal from the University

Policies that Appear in the University System of Maryland Policies:

(These policies found at www.usmd.edu/regents/bylaws)

Academic Advising (111-2.50)
Academic Calendar (111-5.00)
Academic Clemency (111-1.30)
Academic Transcripts and Financial Aid Records (111-6.00)
Acts of Violence and Extremism (VI-1.10)
Admissions (111-4.00)
Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity (VI-1.00)
AIDS (VI-11.00)
Classification of Undergraduate Students (111-6.40)
Combined Bachelor’s and Master’s Programs (111-2.20)
Community Service (V-6.00)
Confidentiality and Disclosure of Student Records (111-6.30)
Constitution of the University System Student Council (1-3.00)
Continuing Education (111-2.00)
Copyrights (IV-3.10)
Credit for Competency-Based Education and Prior Learning (111-1.41)
Curricular and Degree Requirements (111-7.00)
Eligibility to Register (111-2.30)
Emergency Conditions-Cancellation of Classes and Release of Employees (VI-12.00)
Enrollment (111-4.10)
Establishment of Institutional Traffic Regulations
Faculty, Student and Institutional Rights and Responsibilities for Academic Integrity
Misconduct in Scholarly Work
Military Duty (Students)
Payment of Tuition and Fees
Reporting of Campus Crime Statistics
Reports of Intercollegiate Athletics
Research
Review of Alleged Arbitrary and Capricious Grading
Scheduling of Academic Assignments on Dates of Religious Observance
Sexual Harassment-University System of Maryland Policy
Student Affairs
Student Athletics
Student Classification for Admission and Tuition Purposes
Student Employment
Student Financial Aid
Student Housing
Student Misconduct
Student Publications
Student Tuition, Fees and Charges
Summer and Special Sessions
Tuition Remission for Spouses and Dependent Children of Faculty and Staff
Undergraduate Student Concurrent Inter-Institutional Registration
University System Student Council Policy
Use of Alcohol Beverages at University System Institutions and Facilities
Waiver of Application Fees
Waiver of Tuition and Granting of Other Privileges for Senior Citizens of the State of Maryland

All University System of Maryland policies and corresponding Salisbury University policies can be reviewed at www.salisbury.edu/prez/bor.policies.

Appendix B

Maryland Admissions Requirements

  1. The Maryland Higher Education Commission set as a minimum admission standard for all full-time and part-time entering freshmen who have graduated from high school within five years of admission a high school average of C (2.0) or better. Each institution, however, is encouraged to adopt standards above the minimum level.
     
  2. Each institution will develop predictive measures of probable academic success and identify any additional admissions criteria.
     
  3. Students who have earned fewer than 24 credit hours and desire to transfer to state universities and colleges will be admitted under the conditions set down in accordance with the Maryland Student Transfer Policies, which require equal treatment of native and transfer students.
     
  4. In order to attain junior status (60 credit hours), a student must have earned a grade point average of C (2.0) or better. a. In order to ensure equal treatment of the native and transfer student, a transfer student who has earned 60 or more credits at prior institutions must have attained a C (2.0) cumulative average to be accepted at any state university/college.
     
  5. Admission to some designated programs may require higher standards to be limited by the opportunities available to complete a clinical or other requirement of the major program.
     
    1. The institutional standards shall be approved by the Maryland Higher Education Commission and shall be reviewed by the commission on an annual basis.
       
    2. Such standards shall be published in the institution’s catalog.

Policy on Student Classification for Admission and Tuition Purposes

(Approved by the Board of Regents August 28, 1990; Amended July 10, 1998; Amended November 27, 2000; Amended April 11, 2003; Amended June 23, 2006, Amended February 15, 2008, Amended October 24, 2014; Amended April 10, 2015; Amended June 16, 2017)

I. Policy

  1. Purpose
    To extend the benefits of its system of higher education while encouraging the economical use of the State’s resources,1 it is the policy of the Board of Regents of the University System of Maryland (USM) to recognize the categories of in-state and out-of-state residency for the purpose of admission and assessing tuition at USM institutions.
  2. Qualification for In-State Status
    Generally, in order to qualify for in-state status, a prospective, returning, or current student must demonstrate that he or she is a permanent Maryland resident. Under certain circumstances, as set forth in this Policy, students who are not permanent Maryland residents may qualify temporarily for in-state status. Students who do not qualify for instate status under this Policy shall be assigned out-of-state status for admission and tuition purposes.
  3. Standard of Proof
    The student seeking in-state status shall have the burden of proving by clear and convincing evidence that he or she satisfies the requirements and standards set forth in this Policy. Assignment of in-state or out-of-state status will be made by each USM institution upon a review of the totality of facts known or presented to it.

II. Determination of Residency Status

  1. Criteria for Determination of Residency Status
    An initial determination of residency status will be made at the time of admission and readmission based upon information provided by the student with the signed application certifying that the information provided is complete and correct. Additional information may be requested by the institution, to clarify facts presented. To qualify for in-state status, the student must demonstrate that for at least 12 consecutive months immediately prior to and including the last date available to register for courses for the semester/term for which the student seeks in-state status, the student had he continuous intent to reside in Maryland indefinitely and for a primary purpose other than that of attending an educational institution in Maryland. The student will demonstrate the requisite intent by satisfying all of the following requirements for the 12month period (or shorter period indicated):
    1. Has continuously maintained his or her primary living quarters in Maryland.
    2. Has substantially all personal property, such as household effects, furniture, and pets, in Maryland.
    3. Has paid Maryland income tax on all taxable income, including all taxable income earned outside of Maryland, and has filed a Maryland Resident Tax Return.
    4. Has registered all owned or leased motor vehicles in Maryland for at least 12 consecutive months, if previously registered in another state. Students who have lived in Maryland for at least 12 consecutive months but who have had their motor vehicle(s) registered in Maryland for less than 12 months will be deemed to have satisfied this requirement if they can show evidence that their owned or leased motor vehicle(s) was (were) registered in Maryland within 60 days after moving to the state.
    5. Has possessed a valid Maryland driver’s license for at least 12 consecutive months, if previously licensed to drive in another state. Students who have lived in Maryland for at least 12 consecutive months but who have held a Maryland driver’s license for less than 12 months will be deemed to have satisfied this requirement if they can show evidence that their driver’s license was issued in Maryland within 60 days after moving to the state.
    6. Is currently registered to vote in Maryland, if previously registered to vote in another state (no time requirement).
    7. Receives no public assistance from a state other than the State of Maryland or from a city, county, or municipal agency other than one in Maryland.
    8. Has a legal ability under Federal and Maryland law to live permanently and without interruption in Maryland.
  2. Presumption of Out-of-State Status
    Either of the following circumstances raises a presumption that the student is residing in the State of Maryland primarily for the purpose of attending an educational institution and, therefore, does not qualify for in-state status under this Policy:
    1. A student is attending school or living outside Maryland at the time of application for admission to a USM institution, or
    2. A student is Financially Dependent on a person who is not a resident of Maryland. A student will be considered financially independent if the student provides 50% or more of his or her own living and educational expenses and has not been claimed as a dependent on another person’s most recent tax returns.

III. Change in Classification for Tuition Purposes

  1. Petition for Change in Classification for Tuition Purposes
    After the initial determination is made, a student seeking a change to in-state tuition status must submit a Petition for Change in Classification for Tuition Purposes that includes all of the information the student wishes the institution to consider. All information must be submitted by the institution’s deadline for submitting a petition for the semester for which the student seeks reclassification. Only one Petition may be filed per semester.
  2. Criteria for Change in Tuition Status
    A student seeking reclassification from out-of-state to in-state tuition status must demonstrate, by clear and convincing evidence, that for at least twelve (12) consecutive months immediately prior to and including the last date available to register for courses for the semester/term for which the student seeks in-state tuition status, the student had the continuous intent to 1) make Maryland his or her permanent home; 2) abandon his or her former home state; 3) reside in Maryland indefinitely; and reside in Maryland primarily for a purpose other than that of attending an educational institution in Maryland.
    A student will demonstrate the requisite intent by satisfying all of the following requirements for a period of at least twelve (12) consecutive months (or for the shorter period of time indicated) immediately prior to and including the last date available to register for courses in the semester/term for which the student seeks instate tuition status. Evidence of intent must be clear and convincing and will be evaluated not only by the amount presented but also based upon the reliability, authenticity, credibility and relevance of the evidence and the totality of facts known to the institution. The student must demonstrate (providing appropriate documentation as necessary) that for the relevant period he or she:
    1. Continuously maintained his or her primary living quarters in Maryland.
    2. Has substantially all of his or her personal property, such as household effects, furniture and pets, in Maryland.
    3. Has paid Maryland income tax on all taxable income including all taxable income earned outside the State and has filed a Maryland Resident Tax Return.
    4. Has registered all owned or leased motor vehicles in Maryland for at least 12 consecutive months, if previously registered in another state Students who have lived in Maryland for at least 12 consecutive months but who have had their motor vehicle(s) registered in Maryland for less than 12 months will be deemed to have satisfied this requirement if they can show evidence that their owned or leased motor vehicle(s) was (were) registered in Maryland within 60 days after moving to the state.
    5. Has held a valid Maryland driver’s license, if licensed, for at least 12 consecutive months, if a driver’s license was previously held in another state Has possessed a valid Maryland driver’s license for at least 12 consecutive months, if previously licensed to drive in another state. Students who have lived in Maryland for at least 12 consecutive months but who have held a Maryland driver’s license for less than 12 months will be deemed to have satisfied this requirement if they can show evidence that their driver’s license was issued in Maryland within 60 days after moving to the state.
    6. Is currently registered to vote in Maryland, if previously registered to vote in another state (no time requirement).
    7. Receives no public assistance from a state other than the State of Maryland or from a city, county or municipal agency other than one in Maryland.
    8. Has a legal ability under Federal and Maryland law to live permanently without interruption in Maryland.
    9. Has either not raised the presumption set forth in Section II.B above; or alternatively, if the student’s circumstances have raised the presumption set forth in Section II.B above, the student has rebutted that presumption.
  3. Rebuttal Evidence
    If the information received by the institution about the student has raised the presumption set forth in Section II.B, the student bears the burden of rebutting the presumption set forth in Section II.B by presenting additional evidence of objectively verifiable conduct to rebut the presumption and show the requisite intent. Rebuttal evidence of intent must be clear and convincing and will be evaluated not only by the amount presented but also based upon the reliability, authenticity, credibility and relevance of the evidence and the totality of facts known to the institution. Evidence that does not document a period of at least twelve (12) consecutive months immediately prior to and including the last date available to register for courses in the semester/term for which the student seeks in-state tuition status is generally considered an unfavorable factor under this Policy. The absence of objective, relevant evidence is generally considered an unfavorable factor. A student’s statement of intent to remain in Maryland in the future is generally not considered to be objective evidence under this Policy.
    For purposes of rebutting the presumption, additional evidence that will be considered includes, but is not limited to:
    1. Source of financial support:
      1. Maryland employment and earnings history through sources beyond those incident to enrollment as a student in an educational institution e.g., beyond support provided by work study, scholarships, grants, stipends, aid, student loans, etc. (Tuition costs will be considered as a student expense only to the extent tuition exceeds the amount of any educational scholarships, grants, student loans, etc.), or
      2. Evidence the student is Financially Dependent, for the previous 12 months, upon a person who is a resident of Maryland.
    2. Substantial participation as a member of a professional, social, community, civic, political, athletic or religious organization in Maryland, including professionally related school activities that demonstrate a commitment to the student’s community or to the State of Maryland.
    3. Registration as a Maryland resident with the Selective Service, if applicable.
    4. Evidence that the student is married to a Maryland resident.
    5. Evidence that the student attended schools in Maryland for grades K-12.
    6. Evidence showing the student uses his or her Maryland address as his or her sole address of record for all purposes including on health and auto insurance records, bank accounts, tax records, loan and scholarship records, school records, military records, leases, etc.
    7. An affidavit from a person unrelated to the student that provides objective, relevant evidence of a student’s conduct demonstrating the student’s intent to reside in Maryland primarily for a purpose other than that of attending an educational institution in Maryland.
    8. Evidence of life and employment changes that caused the student to relocate to Maryland for reasons other than primarily educational purposes (e.g. divorce, family relocation, taking care of a sick family member, etc.)
  4. Appeal
    A student may appeal an adverse decision on a Petition for Change in Classification.
  5. Change in Circumstances Altering In-State Status
    The student shall notify the USM institution in writing within fifteen (15) days of any change in circumstances which may alter in-state status. Failure to do so could result in retroactive charges for each semester/term affected.
  6. Incomplete, Untimely, False or Misleading Information
    If necessary information is not provided by the institution’s deadline, the USM institution may, at its discretion, deny or revoke in-state status. In the event incomplete, false, or misleading information is presented, the USM institution may, at its discretion, revoke in state status and take disciplinary action provided for by the institution’s policies. Such action may include suspension or expulsion. In such cases, the institution reserves the right to retroactively assess all out-of-state charges for each semester/term affected.

IV. Criteria for Temporary Qualification of Non-Residents for In-State Status

Non-residents with the following status shall be accorded the benefits of in-state status for the period in which they hold such status, if they provide clear and convincing evidence through documentation, by the institution’s deadline for the semester for which they seek in-state status, showing that they fall within one of the following categories:

  1. A full-time or part-time (at least 50 percent) regular employee of USM or a USM institution.
  2. The spouse or Financially Dependent child of a full-time or part-time (at least 50 percent) regular employee of USM or a USM institution.
  3. An active duty member of the Armed Forces of the United States as defined in 38 U.S.C.A. § 101(10) as the United States Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard, including the reserve components thereof, who is stationed in Maryland, resides in Maryland, or is domiciled in Maryland, or his/her spouse or a financially dependent child of that active duty member. Spouses and children who qualify for exemptions under this provision will retain in-state status for tuition purposes as long as they are continuously enrolled, regardless of whether the active duty member’s station assignment, residence, or domicile remains in Maryland.2
  4. A veteran of the Armed Forces of the United States who provides documentation that he or she was honorably discharged and currently resides or is domiciled in Maryland.3
  5. A veteran who lives in Maryland and was discharged from a period of at least 90 days of service in the active military, naval, or air service less than three years before the date of the veteran’s enrollment and is pursuing a course of education with educational assistance under the Montgomery G.I. Bill (38 U.S.C. §3001) or the Post-9/11 G.I. Bill (38 U.S.C. §3301).4 A veteran so described will continue to retain in-state status if the veteran is enrolled prior to the expiration of the three-year period following discharge, is using educational benefits under either chapter 30 or chapter 33, of title 38, United States Code, and remains continuously enrolled (other than during regularly scheduled breaks between courses, semesters, or terms) at the same school.
  6. Anyone who lives in Maryland, and:
    1. Is using transferred Post-9/11 G.I. Bill benefits (38 U.S.C. §3319) and enrolls within three years of the transferor’s discharge or release from a period of at least 90 days of service in the active military, naval or air service; or
    2. Is using transferred Post-9/11 G.I. Bill benefits (38 U.S.C. §3319) and the transferor is a member of the uniformed services who is serving on active duty; or
    3. Is using benefits under the Marine Gunnery Sergeant John David Fry Scholarship (38 U.S.C. § 3311(b) (9)).5
      An individual as described in F.(1) will continue to retain in-state status if the individual is enrolled prior to the expiration of the three-year period following the veteran’s discharge, is using educational benefits under chapter 33, of title 38, United States Code, and remains continuously enrolled (other than during regularly scheduled breaks between courses, semesters, or terms) at the same school.
  7. A member of the Maryland National Guard, as defined in the Public Safety Article of the Maryland Annotated Code, who joined or subsequently serves in the Maryland National Guard to: (i) provide a critical military occupational skill; or (ii) be a member of the Air Force Critical Specialty Code as determined by the National Guard.
  8. For UMUC, only, a full-time active member of the Armed Forces of the United States on active duty, or his/her spouse.
  9. A graduate assistant appointed through a USM institution for the semester/term of the appointment. Except through prior arrangement, this benefit is available only for enrollment at the institution awarding the assistantship.

V. Additional Procedures

Each USM institution shall develop and publish additional procedures to implement this Policy. Procedures shall provide that on request the institution President or designee has the authority to waive any requirement set forth in Section II if it is determined that the application of the requirements creates an unjust result. These procedures shall be filed with the Office of the Chancellor.

VI. Definitions

  1. Financially Dependent: For the purposes of this Policy, a financially dependent student is one who has been claimed as a dependent on another person’s prior year tax returns or is a ward of the State of Maryland.
  2. Financially Independent: For the purposes of this Policy, a financially independent student is one who provides 50% or more of his or her own living and educational expenses and has not been claimed as a dependent on another person’s most recent tax returns.
  3. Parent: A parent may be a natural parent, or, if established by a court order recognized under the law of the State of Maryland, an adoptive parent.
  4. Guardian: A guardian is a person so appointed by a court order recognized under the laws of the State of Maryland.
  5. Spouse: A spouse is a partner in a legally contracted marriage.
  6. Child: A child is a natural child or a child legally adopted pursuant to a court order recognized under the law of Maryland.
  7. Regular Employee: A regular employee is a person employed by USM or a USM institution who is assigned to a State budget line or who is otherwise eligible to enroll in a State retirement system. Examples of categories NOT considered regular employees are graduate students, contingent employees, and independent contractors
  8. Continuous Enrollment:
    1. Undergraduate Student - An undergraduate student who is enrolled at a USM institution for consecutive fall and spring semesters, until completion of the student’s current degree program or unless on an approved leave of absence or participating in an approved program off-campus.
    2. Graduate and Professional - Continuous enrollment for a graduate or professional student is defined by the institution in accordance with program requirements.
  9. Armed Forces of the United States: As defined in 38 U.S.C.A. § 101(10) as the United States Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard, including the reserve components thereof.

VI. Implementation

This Policy as amended by the Board of Regents on March 1, 2019, shall be applied to all student tuition classification decisions effective spring semester 2018 and thereafter.

NOTES
1 Annotated Code of Maryland, Education Article,§12- ‐101.
2 Annotated Code of Maryland, Education Article §15- ‐106.4.
3 Id.
4 38 U.S.C.A. § 3679(c).
5 Id.

Appendix C

General Education: Student Learning Principles and Goals

Purpose

The General Education program is designed to foster the personal, intellectual and social development of the Salisbury University student. Salisbury University provides an institutional environment and academic curriculum that supports interconnected learning and experiences, which signify an ability to analyze and make connections between ideas, concepts and experiences - both on and off campus.

Program Principles

The General Education Program advances the University’s mission to empower our students with the knowledge, skills and core values that contribute to active citizenship, gainful employment and life-long learning in a democratic society and interdependent world by:

  • providing a coherent integrated curriculum that speaks largely to the student learning goals. Coherence is the inter-connectedness of the curriculum within courses, across disciplines and throughout the undergraduate experience.
  • encouraging the developmental progression of student knowledge, skills and dispositions throughout the undergraduate experience.
  • providing a broad range of learning opportunities in courses, in co-curricular activities and in settings outside the University.
  • fostering an academic community that is guided by the University’s core values of excellence, student centeredness, learning, civic engagement and diversity through student-to-student, faculty-to-student and faculty-to-faculty collaborative opportunities. Collaboration may occur in linked courses, interdisciplinary courses, undergraduate research, learning communities, community projects and other venues.
  • incorporating ongoing and comprehensive review of the General Education curriculum and assessment of student progress toward learning goals. This review and assessment will be used for the continued improvement of General Education to achieve institutional goals and vision.

Student Learning Goals

The principles and goals, which follow, represent the concepts embedded in the Mission Statement and the Attributes Document accepted by the faculty. These principles and goals will help guide the development of the General Education program at Salisbury University.

Learning Principles

The General Education program is designed to foster the personal, intellectual and social development of the Salisbury University student and is based on the following set of principles. The liberally educated person:

  • communicates effectively in diverse situations,
  • uses multiple strategies, resources and technologies for inquiry and problem solving,
  • demonstrates qualities related to personal, social and professional integrity,
  • integrates knowledge from the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences to broaden perspectives,
  • reasons quantitatively and qualitatively,
  • demonstrates global awareness in order to function responsibly in an interdependent world.

These principles are expressed by the following set of student learning goals.

Student Learning Goals and Outcomes

The following broad categories organize the student learning goals and outcomes that align with the purpose of General Education. Previously acknowledged Student Learning Goals are aligned with the proposed Student Learning Outcomes listed below.

Essential Competencies

Essential Competencies are the intellectual habits and skills that students progressively develop in order to succeed as undergraduates and as members of a rapidly changing and globally interconnected society. Upon completion of their studies at SU, students will demonstrate effective reading and communication, critical thinking and reasoning, quantitative reasoning, scientific reasoning, information literacy as the means by which to solve problems.

  • Critical Thinking & Reasoning: Students will be able to comprehensively analyze evidence before they create, critique, or accept an opinion, conclusion, or determine a need for further investigation.
  • Effective Reading: Students will be able to extract and construct meaning by interacting with written language.
  • Information Literacy: Students will be able to determine the extent of information needed; access information effectively and efficiently; evaluate information and its sources critically; use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose; and use information ethically.
  • Oral Communication: Students will be able to prepare, deliver, and reflect upon purposeful oral communication appropriate to the audience, purpose, and context.
  • Quantitative Reasoning: Students will be able to interpret models and solve quantitative problems from different contexts with real-world relevance; understand and create reasonable arguments supported by quantitative evidence; and clearly communicate those arguments in effective formats (e.g., using words, tables, graphs, and mathematical equations).
  • Scientific Reasoning: Students will be able to identify and use empirical evidence to describe, explain, and predict natural phenomena through application of the scientific method; and use scientific principles to design, evaluate, and implement strategies to answer open-ended questions.
  • Understanding the Human World: Students will explore methods that will enable them to recognize and interpret evidence of human thought, action, expression, and experience, using contexts and narratives to understand humanity’s change over time.
  • Written Communication: Students will be able to develop and clearly express ideas through writing, in appropriate styles, by incorporating evidence when warranted.

Foundational Knowledge

Foundational Knowledge describes the breadth of information and experiences needed to succeed in a globally interconnected world, and is achieved through the study of the arts, humanities, mathematics, natural sciences, and social sciences. Upon completion of their studies at SU, students will demonstrate knowledge of the human experience, the physical world, and ways of knowing.

  • Knowledge of the Human Experience: Students will be able to describe and compare the development and impact of various artistic, cultural, economic, historical, intellectual, linguistic, political, social, or spiritual systems; and recognize common questions and concerns humans confront and the diverse strategies for resolving those concerns.
  • Knowledge of the Physical World: Students will be able to describe some of the major concepts in science to explain natural phenomena; and evaluate the quality of scientific information on the basis of methods used to generate it.

Personal, Social and Cultural Responsibility

Personal, Social, and Cultural Responsibility integrates the knowledge, skills, and core values that allow students to learn, live, and lead effectively as scholars, employees, and active citizens. Upon completion of their studies at SU, students will show evidence of civic and community engagement, knowledge of emerging and global issues, a commitment to and knowledge of environmental sustainability, ethical reasoning, respect for inclusion and diversity, intellectual curiosity, intercultural competence, as well as be aware of issues of personal health and wellness.

  • Civic & Community Engagement: Students will demonstrate knowledge and skills necessary to participate actively in civic and community life and identify issues underlying public policy.
  • Emerging & Enduring Global Issues: Students will be informed, responsible, and able to consider and discuss emerging and enduring global issues, attentive to diversity across the spectrum of differences; understand how their actions affect both local and global communities; and address the world’s most pressing and enduring issues collaboratively and equitably.
  • Environmental Sustainability: Students will be able to trace the ways in which individual actions are linked to interconnected natural and social systems and the sustainability thereof.
  • Ethical Reasoning: Students will be able to reason about right and wrong human conduct; assess their own ethical values and the social context of problems; recognize ethical issues in a variety of settings; think about how different ethical perspectives might be applied; and consider the ramifications of alternate actions.
  • Inclusion & Diversity: Students will demonstrate an openness to the pluralistic nature of local, national, and global institutions, societies, and cultures as well as develop characteristics of respect, connection, and involvement among people with different experiences and perspectives.
  • Intellectual Curiosity: Students will explore a range of topics; be open minded to new ideas and ways of thinking; and be able to ask relevant questions or develop original thoughts.
  • Intercultural Competence: Students will be able to demonstrate the necessary knowledge, self-awareness, and behaviors to support effective and appropriate interactions in a variety of cultural and linguistic contexts that build and enhance relationships.
  • Personal Health & Wellness: Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of skills and habits to promote personal lifelong health and wellness, including, but not limited to, emotional, financial, and physical.

Appendix D

Fulton School Curriculum Reform: Course Enhancement Menu

The Fulton School Course Enhancement Menu identifies enhancements for four-credit courses which meet three-credit class time guidelines. The intent of the four-credit courses is to increase SU’s academic standards and adjust them upward by adding one or more of the following enhancements to the current three-credit courses. Starting fall 2008, most courses in the Fulton School of Liberal Arts are offered for four credits. Most will meet three hours each week with a one-credit enhancement. The following enhancement menu specifies the seven types of course enhancements.

One-credit Course Enhancements

Increased course content and/or collateral readings

Example: more primary, secondary and/or supplemental readings

Undergraduate Research and Information Literacy

Example: assignments that fulfill department programmatic approaches to undergraduate research and information literacy, systematically building students’ research and writing skills throughout their majors

Technology

Example: instructor-developed content, commercially developed course packs, digital audio (podcasting), video demonstrations, chat rooms, course blogs, individual WebCT tutoring, teleconferences with students at other campuses or international groups, field research, student-authored independent research

Higher Level Critical Thinking Exercises

Example: assignments that specifically develop analysis, synthesis and evaluation, as opposed to lower-level critical thinking exercises that target knowledge, comprehension and application

Service Learning/Civic Engagement

Example: assignments which place students in leadership positions to conceive of and implement programs that they know will benefit others; assignments which involve students in developing good civic dispositions, as suggested in the 2006 Middle States Report

International Education/Cultural Enrichment

Example: spring break study/experience abroad, museum visits, cultural experiences within the geographical area

Additional Hour(s) in Class, Lab or Studio

Appendix E

Fulton School 102-Level Foreign Language Requirement for Select Majors

Fulfilling the Requirement

Students may fulfill the requirement via one of the following ways:

  • Three or more years of study of one foreign language in high school; no college course work is needed to meet the requirement.
  • A combination of high school and college study; the most common example being two years of high school foreign language study plus a 102-level course in the same language in college.
  • College-only study of one foreign language by taking both 101- and 102-level courses in college.

For additional information, students may consult the chair of their major department.

Special Cases

Heritage Speakers

Heritage speakers of a language other than English who do not present high school or pre-SU college study of the language, but propose to use that language to fulfill the requirement, may demonstrate proficiency through the 102 level via an appropriate placement examination administered or arranged by SU’s Modern Languages and Intercultural Studies Department.

International Students

Native speakers of a language other than English fulfill the foreign language requirement through their satisfactory performance on the TOEFL exam.

Appendix F

Henson School of Science and Technology Course Repeat Policy

The Henson School of Science and Technology Repeat Policy was established to provide students who have multiple course attempts with the appropriate academic support. Salisbury University’s commitment to students’ success includes ensuring the opportunity to complete an undergraduate degree within four years. However, the repetition of the same course often demonstrates the need for extra academic assistance to stay or get back on track. This Repeat Policy facilitates an enhanced level of intervention based on a students’ needs that will help achieve their academic goals. This policy applies to all undergraduate courses offered in the Henson School of Science and Technology, effective academic year 2013-2014. (Note: other restrictions on course repeats may apply; check with specific academic programs for details).

  • Students may repeat courses offered by the Henson School of Science and Technology one time at Salisbury University without special permission. These include courses with prefixes BIOL, CHEM, COSC, ENGR, GEOG, GEOL, MATH, PHYS, for which the student earned any grade (B, C, D, F, PS, I, W, WP, WF, NGR or Audit). Students should take note that grades of W, WF or WP earned by withdrawing from a class after the schedule adjustment period (typically the first week of the semester for Spring/Fall and the first three days for Summer/Winter) are considered grades and are subject to this policy. Exceptions are those courses that may be repeated for credit (e.g., BIOL 490 , CHEM 499 ). Also, some majors may limit students to a single repeat of specific courses (see requirements for your major).
  • Students who wish to repeat a course a second time (third enrollment) must seek approval from the Henson Dean’s Office by completing a Henson School of Science and Technology Repeat Request form (www.salisbury.edu/academic-offices/advising-center/henson.aspx). Completion of this process does not guarantee enrollment for a third time, as enrollment will depend upon a compelling plan for success and available seats in the course. Students will not be allowed to enroll in a course for a fourth time unless there are extremely extenuating circumstances.
  • Please note that all grades appear on students’ transcripts. For undergraduate courses, the grade from the most recent attempt at SU is used to calculate grade point averages, even if that grade is lower than the first time the student took the course. Students transferring credits from other institutions should be aware that these courses may complete degree requirements, but grades earned in these transferred courses will not be used in SU GPA calculations and do not replace any grade earned in the equivalent course at SU.