Jun 25, 2024  
2023-2024 Undergraduate & Graduate Catalog 
    
2023-2024 Undergraduate & Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Faculty Handbook Appendices and Forms


 

Appendix A6 Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Guidelines

Appendix A10 H1B Visa Overview

Appendix B  Sample Letters of Appointment for New Faculty

Appendix C Checklist of Required Materials in Promotions Applications

Appendix D Checklist of Required Materials in Tenure Applications

Appendix E Faculty Welfare Grievance Procedures

Appendix F Sample Memorandum of Professional Expectation for Full-Time Contractual Faculty

Appendix G  Sabbatical Leave Request Form

Appendix J Foundation Grants

Appendix LIB-B Criteria for Rank, Promotion, Permanent Status and Post-Permanent Status Review

Appendix LIB-C Dossier Contents and Responsibilities

Appendix LIB-D Calendar of Key Dates for Library Faculty

Appendix M Establishing Departmental Committees for T&P

Appendix O     Evaluation Form for Tenured and Tenure-Track Faculty

Appendix Q    Evaluation Form for Full-Time, Non-Tenure Track Faculty

Appendix R    Evaluation Form for Part-Time, Non-Tenure Track Faculty

 

Appendix A6: Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Guidelines

 

Lawful And Unlawful Pre-Employment Inquiries

State fair employment practice laws expressly prohibit inquiries on applications for employment concerning the applicant’s race, color, religion or national origin, and state Commissions have determined that such direct inquiries, as well as the elicitation of indirect indicia, such as former name, past residences, names of relatives, place of birth, citizenship, education, work and military experience, organizational activities, references and photographs may be unlawful.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 does not expressly prohibit pre-employment inquiries concerning a job applicant’s race, color, religion, or national origin. The legislative history of the statute is silent as to the Congressional intent on the subject.

Although Title VII does not make pre-employment inquiries concerning race, color, religion or national origin per se violations of law, the Commission’s responsibility to promote equal employment opportunity compels it to regard such inquiries with extreme disfavor. Except in those infrequent instances where religion or national origin is a bona fide occupational qualification (BFOQ) reasonably necessary for the performance of a particular job, an applicant’s race, religion and the like are totally irrelevant to his or her ability or qualifications as a prospective employee, and no useful purpose is served by eliciting such information. The Commission is also mindful that such inquiries traditionally have been used to deprive individuals of employment opportunities and to discriminate in ways now prescribed by Title VII.

Accordingly, in the investigation of charges alleging the Commission of unlawful employment practices, the Commission will pay particular attention to the use by the party against whom charges have been made of pre-employment inquiries concerning race, religion, color or national origin, or other inquiries which tend directly or indirectly to disclose such information. The fact that such questions are asked may, unless otherwise explained, constitutes evidence of discrimination, and will weigh significantly in the Commission’s decision as to whether or not Title VII has been violated.

Pre-employment inquiries, which are made in conformance with instructions from, or the requirements of, an agency or agencies of the local, State, or Federal Government in connection with the administration of a fair employment practices program, will not constitute evidence of discrimination under Title VII.

 

Questions to Avoid in Pre-Employment Application Forms

1. Age? Date of Birth? The Age Discrimination In Employment Act of 1967 (29 USC 621-34) prohibits discrimination on the basis of age against individuals who are between the ages of 40 and 64, inclusive (amended 1978 (40-70)). A majority of states also have laws prohibiting age discrimination. Thus, the answer to this question could be used unlawfully.

2. ARRESTS? Consideration of arrest records is almost certainly unlawful. An arrest is no indication whatsoever of guilt, and historically minorities have suffered proportionately more arrests than others (See Carter v. Gallagher, 451 F. 2nd 315 [8th Cir. 1971] and Gregory v. Litton Systems, Inc., 316 F. Supp. 401 [C.D. Cal. 1970]). The U.S. Department of Labor has also recognized the potential for discrimination in the consideration of arrest records. See 60-2.24(d) (3) of Revised Order No. 4(41 CFR 60.2), establishing standards and guidelines for the affirmative action programs required of government contractors.

3. AVAILABLE FOR SATURDAY AND SUNDAY WORK? This question may serve to discourage applications from persons of certain religions, which prohibit their adherents from working on Saturdays or Sunday. On the other hand, it may be necessary to know whether an applicant can work on these days. Section 701 (j) of Title VII, as amended in 1972, prohibits discrimination on the basis of religion and defines religion to include “all aspects of religious observance and practices, as well as belief, unless an employer demonstrates that he is unable to reasonably accommodate to an employee’s or prospective employee’s religious observance or practice without undue hardship on the conduct of the employer’s business.” See also “EEOC Religious Discrimination Guidelines,” 29 CFR 1605.1. If this kind of question is asked, it would be desirable to indicate that a reasonable effort will be made to accommodate to the religious needs of employees.

4. CHILDREN UNDER 18? NUMBER OF CHILDREN? AGE OF CHILDREN? WHAT ARRANGEMENTS WILL YOU MAKE FOR CARE OF MINOR CHILDREN? The purpose of these questions is to explore what the employer believes to be a common source of absenteeism and tardiness. But why explore this area in such an indirect way, and in a way that applies only to women for all practical purposes? There are a number of common causes of absenteeism and tardiness which affect both men and women and which would be worthy of exploration if this is a matter of substantial concern to the employer. The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that in the absence of proof of business necessity, Title VII prohibits an employer from having one hiring policy for women and another for men - each having pre-school age children. See Phillips v. Martin Marietta, 400 U.S. 542 (1971). It is also important to note that any selection procedure, which has an adverse effect on persons with dependent children, will affect minorities and Catholics more than other, since they have, on the average, more children.

5. CITIZEN OF WHAT COUNTRY? The Commission has adopted Guidelines on Discrimination because of National Origin (29 CFR 1606) which contain the following statement: “Because discrimination on the basis of citizenship has the effect of discriminating on the basis of national origin, a lawfully immigrated alien who is domiciled or residing in this country may not be discriminated against on the basis of his citizenship,” except pursuant to national security requirements required by a federal statute or executive order. At least one federal court has expressly agreed with this analysis (Guzman v. Polich and Benedict Construction Co., –F. Supp.__ 2EPD 10,156 [C.D. Calif. 1970]) and one has disagreed (Espinoza v. Farah Mfg. Col, 313 U.S. 811 [1973]). In addition, this question asks what country the applicant is a citizen of, thus permitting discrimination on the basis of particular national origin.

6. CONVICTIONS (OTHER THAN TRAFFIC VIOLATIONS)? To the extent that this question implies an absolute bar to the employment of an applicant who has a conviction record, it is probably unlawful. See Charter v. Gallagher, supra. This is because some minority groups in our society have conviction records substantially in excess of the average, taking into consideration their relative numbers and the extent of their “criminal” activity. On the other hand, an employer probably has the right to exclude persons who have been convicted of certain offenses from certain kinds of jobs, at least if this is done on a carefully considered basis. To avoid frightening off qualified applicants who have irrelevant criminal records, the best practice would be to obtain conviction information through local police departments rather than from applicants. If this is not possible, the application form might state the existence of a criminal record does not constitute an automatic bar to employment. In addition, each person who will evaluate information concerning criminal records should be given careful instructions as to its limited usefulness.

7. CREDIT RECORD: (CHARGE ACCOUNTS? OWN YOUR OWN HOME? OWN YOUR OWN FURNITURE? OWN A CAR?) Because minority persons are far poorer on the average than whites, consideration of these factors has an adverse effect on minorities and is probably unlawful unless required by considerations of business necessity. See CD 72-0427, CCH 6312. The U.S. Department of Labor has also recognized the potential for discrimination in the consideration of credit records. See Revised Order No. 4 (41 CFR 60-2.25 [d] [3]) establishing standards and guidelines for affirmative action programs required of government contractors.

8. EYES? HAIR? Eye color and hair color are not related to the performance of any job an may serve to indicate an employee’s race or religion.

9. FIDELITY BOND EVER REFUSED TO YOU? This question presumably represents an indirect effort to find flaws, which may exist in an individual’s past. The difficulty with this means, however, is that a fidelity bond may be denied for totally arbitrary and discriminatory reasons which the individual does not have an adequate opportunity to know of or challenge. Thus the method of ascertaining an individual’s past history should be dropped in favor of some other method, which is not so likely to be infected with bias. The Maryland Commission on Human Relations has issued an order prohibiting an employer from asking about bond refusals because of the discriminatory impact this kind of question may have. See CCH 5047.

10. FRIENDS OR RELATIVES WORKING WITH US? This question may reflect for friends or relatives of present employees. Such a preference would be unlawful if it has the effect of reducing employment opportunities for women or minorities. It would have this unlawful effect if present work force differs significantly in its proportion of women or minorities form the population of the area from which workers are recruited. This question may also reflect a rule that only one partner in a marriage can work for the employer. There is a growing recognition that such a rule hurts women far more often than men and that the rule serves no necessary business necessity.

11. GARNISHMENT RECORD? In Johnson v. Pike Corporation of America, 332 F. Supp. 490 (C.D. Calif. 1971), the court ruled that an employer violated Title VII by discharging a Black employee because his wages had been garnished several times. This district court based its conclusion on the reasoning of the Supreme Court’s testing ruling, Griggs v. Duke Power Co., 401 U.S. 424 (1971), and on the district court’s findings that minorities suffer wage garnishments substantially more often that whites, and that wage garnishments do not affect a worker’s ability to perform his/her work effectively.

12. HEIGHT? WEIGHT? Some employers have imposed minimum height or weight requirements for employees, who are not related to the job to be performed, and which have the effect of excluding above-average percentages of women and members of certain nationality groups. Unless height or weight is directly related to a job requirement, these questions should not be asked.

13. LOWEST SALARY WILL ACCEPT. Women generally have been relegated to poorer paying jobs than men, and have been paid less than men for the same work. As a result of this discrimination, a woman might be willing to work for less pay than a man would find acceptable. It is unlawful, however, to pay a woman less than a man would be paid because of community wage patterns, which are based on discrimination. See Hodgson v. City Stores, Inc., 332 F. Supp. 942 (M.D. Ala. 1971).

14. MAIDEN NAME? This is not relevant to a person’s ability to perform a job and could be used for a discriminatory purpose. For example, a women’s maiden name might be used as an indication of her religion or national origin. This item also constitutes an inquiry into marital status, which is discussed below.

15. MARITAL STATUS? Some employers have refused to hire a married woman for certain jobs. Most airlines, for example, refused for many years to permit a married woman to be a flight attendant, though other employees could be married. This practice was held to violate Title VII of the civil Rights Act of 1964 in Sprogis v. United Air Lines, 444 F. 2d 1194 (7th Cir. 1971), and the EEOC Guidelines on Sex Discrimination (29 CFR 1604. (a)) expresses that same conclusion. It would also violate Title VII for an employer to refuse to hire a married woman or pay a married woman less than a married man for the same work because the woman’s pay represents a second income while the man’s does not. Finally an employer could not refuse to hire a married woman for any job or for a particular job because of the employer’s beliefs concerning morality or family responsibility.

16. MR., MISS or MRS.? This is simply another way of asking the applicant’s sex and (for women only) marital status (see No. 15). Even asking an applicant’s first name normally serves no other pre-employment purpose than to indicate the applicant’s sex.

17. PRIOR MARRIED NAME? This question asks, in effect, whether an individual has been divorced. By its nature, however, it asks this question only of women because only a woman changes her name on marriage. Thus, the question is discriminatory unless the employer must have the information for purposes of pre-employment investigation.

18. SEX? Title VII prohibits discrimination in employment on the basis of sex except in the few instances in which sex may be a “bona fide occupational qualification” reasonably necessary to the normal operation of the employer’s business. There are virtually no jobs, which can be performed only by one sex or the other. For this reason it would be desirable to omit any questions asking the applicant’s sex from an application form that is intended for general use.

19. SPOUSE’S NAME? To the extent that this question asks for marital status, the comments on marital status (No. 15) apply. A spouse’s name may also be used as an indication of religion or national origin.

20. SPOUSE’S WORK? To the extent that this question asks for marital status, the comments on marital status (No. 15) apply. In addition, some employers have been reluctant to hire a woman if that would make her the second breadwinner in the family, whereas there is seldom any objection to hiring a man if that would make him the second breadwinner in the family. Such a policy is unlawful under Title VII and other nondiscrimination law.

21. WIDOWED, DIVORCED, OR SEPARATED? Recent statistics show that many more Black than white persons are either widowed, divorced, or separated and that a much larger proportion of women than men in the labor force is either widowed, divorced, or separated. Thus this question has a potential for adversely affecting women and Blacks.

 

 

Appendix A-10: H1B VISA Overview

H1B temporary workers are defined as persons who will perform services in specialty occupations on a temporary basis. The Immigration Act of 1990 defines specialty occupation as: “an occupation which requires theoretical and practical application of a body of highly specialized knowledge to fully perform the occupation.” To qualify as a “specialty occupation” the position must meet the following requirements:

1. A baccalaureate or higher degree (or its equivalent) in a specific academic field is normally the minimum requirement for entry into a particular profession. This can be demonstrated through one or more of the following criteria:

a. The degree requirement is common to the industry.

b. The employer normally requires a degree or its equivalent for the position.

c. The job duties must be “so specialized and complex that knowledge required to perform the duties is usually associated with the attainment of a baccalaureate or higher degree.”

d. The position’s level of responsibility and authority must be “commensurate with professional standing.” The H1B status can be used to bring temporary faculty members, researchers, consultants, administrators, or individuals engaged in a variety of professional-level activities to the United States.

To qualify for H1B status, the alien must possess the required degree in the specific field (or a closely related field) or its equivalent or possess a certificate or license that permits the alien to immediately practice the profession in the state of intended employment. The H1B is employer-specific; the employee may only work for the employer who filed the H1B petition, and can only perform the job included in the petition in the specific location noted on the petition.  Any changes to a sponsored employee’s position or work location must be brought to the attention of the employer representative before such changes are implemented.

In applying for an H1B visa on behalf of an employee, Salisbury University is affirmatively attesting to the above, AND each of the following:

  • Wages: Wage offered must be higher of prevailing wage or actual wage paid to similarly situated employees
  • Working conditions: Employment of H-1B worker will not affect wages/working conditions of similarly situated employees
  • No strike or lockout: At time of filing, there is no strike, lockout or work stoppage in occupation at workplace
  • Notice: Employer has given notice to employees that a Labor Condition Application (LCA) was filed

Temporary Employment:

The H1B is a temporary visa. The alien must be coming to temporarily fill a position that may, or may not in itself be temporary. The H1B is granted initially for a period of three (3) years, and is renewable for a second three (3) year period.  After the initial six (6) years of employment the alien will no longer qualify for sponsorship unless specific requirements are met. The letter of appointment and other documents must stipulate the temporary nature of the appointment.

Obtaining the H1B for Employment:

The H1B process takes at least six (6) months prior to the requested H1B employment date. US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS, also referred to as Immigration (previously known as INS) is a branch of the US Department of Homeland Security) determines eligibility status, not SU, SU’s Provost, or the Chief Human Resources Officer of SU. After determining that the person qualifies for H1B status, the employer must obtain the Labor Conditions Application (LCA) from the Department of Labor (DOL). Once the certified LCA is received, the H1B petition will be filed. The petition must show that the alien is entering the United States or changing to H1B status for the purpose of temporary employment. The petition must be accompanied by supporting documents such as degrees or academic records, licenses to practice a profession, and letters and other documents attesting to the alien’s qualifications.

USCIS has instituted a Premium Processing Service. In the event that the visa petition has not been finalized prior to the start date of the incoming faculty member, a premium processing fee may need to be submitted to USCIS. In this case, the petition will be adjudicated within 15 calendar days of receipt. The University does not routinely pay for premium processing..

Period of Stay:

An H1B may be initially issued for a minimum period of one (1) year or for three (3) years. Extensions may be obtained, but the total period of authorized stay cannot exceed six (6) years, unless the individual has progressed through the requisite steps leading toward permanent residency.

If the employer dismisses the alien prior to the expiration of the authorized stay, the employer is liable for the reasonable cost of return transportation for the alien abroad.

Legal Penalties:

By signing the Request Form, the employer representative is attesting to the accuracy of the information that is on the form and supporting documents. To knowingly furnish any false information; conceal or cover-up information; make any false, fictitious or fraudulent statements or representations, or make or use any false writing or document in the preparation of a U.S. government document, or to aid, abet, or counsel another to do so is a felony, punishable by a $10,000 fine or five years in the penitentiary, or both.

Transferring Employers:

Due to the new portability provisions of Public Law 106-313 (Title I), Section 105, it is possible to “transfer” H1B status to another employer based on the timely filing of a petition for new employment by that sponsoring employer. A request to transfer H1B status will still require attorney assistance but may enable a transferring employee to start upon filing of the petition with USCIS rather than waiting for a final decision from USCIS.

Tips and Reminders:

OVERVIEW OF STEPS

Consideration for hiring foreign aliens due to the visa costs, preparations, etc. is available for full-time tenure track positions.

Although Salisbury University is not required to sponsor aliens with respect to the petition process, if necessary to begin an appointment,the University may pay for the customary fees of SU’s immigration attorney who would work with the incoming faculty member in securing the visa. If required, Salisbury University may also pay the cost of the I-129 application, and premium processing service for the H-1B visa if necessary to ensure proper work authorization by the beginning of this appointment. Please note that Salisbury University will not pay any costs associated with securing a visa for any member(s) of the incoming faculty member’s family. Sponsorship at any point beyond the beginning of the appointment may be considered if satisfying the requirements of the Immigration and Nationality Act is in jeopardy thus placing the employment in jeopardy.

  • In signing the employment/appointment agreement, the candidate agrees to comply and be timely with any documents that are requested by the University, immigration attorney or USCIS.
  • Upon signing of the agreement the Provost’s Office notifies the Human Resources (HR) Office and forwards a copy of the agreement with all pertinent contact information to HR.
  • The Provost’s Office will need to provide HR with full contact information of the incoming faculty member (i.e. name, address, phone number, email address).
  • Once HR receives a copy of the signed agreement and incoming faculty member’s information, they will contact the immigration attorney to begin work on the petition and VISA processing requirements.
  • A meeting will be scheduled with the attorney, SU representative(s), and the incoming faculty member to begin the necessary interview to acquire, review, organize and prepare documents necessary to supplement the petition to the USCIS.
  • Attorney prepares petition for Non-Immigrant Worker, forms (e.g. I-129, H Supplement and W Supplement) and applications pertaining to the incoming faculty member.
  • Attorney works with the Human Resources Office to complete the employer questionnaire for the University.
  • Attorney and the Human Resources Office work jointly on preparing and completing the prevailing wage request.
  • H1B petition notice must be posted for 10 days in the corresponding hiring Department and on the University/HR bulletin board.
  • Attorney prepares petition forms, Letter of Support and submits to HR Office for review. The reviewed documentation is then forwarded to the Provost’s Office for signature.
  • Upon completion of entire package, attorney files the petition with USCIS.
  • Copy of package is sent to the University Human Resources Office.
  • Attorney is responsible for all follow-up work required on the package, including but not limited to, supplementing the application should Homeland Security require additional information.

 

The estimated timeframe from the time the attorney receives the required documentation from the incoming faculty member to the submission to USCIS and final USCIS decision, is approximately six (6) months. This timeframe assumes that the incoming faculty member is prompt in providing all the required documentation to the attorney.

In the event that the VISA petition has not been finalized prior to the start date of the incoming faculty member, a premium processing fee may need to be submitted to USCIS. The premium processing fee expedites the USCIS to adjudicate a complete petition within 15 calendar days of receipt.

Attorney retained by SU:

Fragomen, Del Rey, Bernsen & Loewy, LLP

1101 15th Street, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20005

 

Firm provides legal services for employees seeking permission to work in the U.S. either temporarily or permanently.

 

Appendix C: Checklist of Required Materials for Faculty Promotion

  1. Curriculum Vita
  2. Provost’s Statement of Eligibility
  3. Application for Promotion: Two to three page introduction and overview with special attention paid to specific qualifications for promotion based on activities and development within the areas of teaching, professional development, and service.
  4. Annual Chair’s/School Director’s Evaluation with Self-Evaluations Appended for the last four years.
  5. Letters of Support (maximum of five)
  6. Summary of Evidence of Effective Teaching: This is an opportunity for the candidate to describe their teaching methodology, innovations, improvements, successes, and failures as well as curricular and program developments and revisions.
  7. Supporting Evidence of Effective Teaching: The evidence might come in many forms but must at least include a) Some course materials developed by the applicant, b) Clear and understandable summaries and analyses of student evaluations for the last four years, and c) Actual student evaluations, in the students’ own handwriting if available, for the previous teaching semester. (If original student evaluations are not available for open-ended evaluation questions, an explanation should be provided.) A brief description of the evaluation process-when it occurred, under what circumstances, etc.-would also be helpful.
  8. (Optional) Statement of Additional Duties. This is an opportunity for faculty who have responsibilities and duties related or in addition to teaching, including advising or mentoring or additional administrative duties which are part of their job expectations but outside the realm of full-time teaching, to describe those responsibilities and provide evidence as to their effectiveness in these additional roles.
  9. Summary and Evidence of Professional Development. The candidate should summarize professional development activities. The candidate should focus special attention on the three most significant accomplishments since the applicant’s last promotion and the ways in which those activities enhance the candidate’s qualifications as a teacher and scholar.
  10. Summary of Evidence of Service. Candidate should summarize service to the department, school, university, and community, with special attention paid to identifying and explaining the candidate’s three most significant service contributions since their last promotion.
  11. Addenda: The candidate may elect to include additional pertinent information, which falls outside the categories identified above. 

 

Appendix D: Checklist of Required Materials For Faculty Tenure

  1. Curriculum Vita
  2. Provost’s Statement of Eligibility
  3. Application for Tenure: Two to three page introduction and overview with special attention paid to specific qualifications for tenure and promotion based on activities and development within the areas of teaching, professional development, and service.
  4. Annual Chair’s/School Director’s Evaluation with Self-Evaluations Appended for the last three years.
  5. Letters of Support (maximum of five)
  6. Summary of Evidence of Effective Teaching: This is an opportunity for the candidate to describe their teaching methodology, innovations, improvements, successes, and failures as well as curricular and program developments and revisions.
  7. Supporting Evidence of Effective Teaching: The evidence might come in many forms but must at least include a) Some course materials developed by the applicant, b) Clear and understandable summaries and analyses of student evaluations for the last three years, and c) Actual student evaluations, in the students’ own handwriting if available, for the previous teaching semester. (If original student evaluations are not available for open-ended evaluation questions, an explanation should be provided.) A brief description of the evaluation process-when it occurred, under what circumstances, etc.-would also be helpful.
  8. (Optional) Statement of Additional Duties. This is an opportunity for faculty who have responsibilities and duties related or in addition to teaching, including advising or mentoring or additional administrative duties which are part of their job expectations but outside the realm of full-time teaching, to describe those responsibilities and provide evidence as to their effectiveness in these additional roles.
  9. Summary and Evidence of Professional Development. The candidate should summarize professional development activities. The candidate should focus special attention on the three most significant accomplishments since the applicant’s appointment to a tenure-track position and the ways in which those activities enhance the candidate’s qualifications as a teacher and scholar.
  10. Summary of Evidence of Service. Candidate should summarize service to the department, school, university, and community, with special attention paid to identifying and explaining the candidate’s three most significant service contributions since their appointment to a tenure-track position.
  11. Addenda: The candidate may elect to include additional pertinent information, which falls outside the categories identified above.

 

Appendix E: Faculty Welfare Committee Grievance Procedures

The Faculty Welfare Committee shall serve as a grievance hearing board in matters of promotion and merit pay decisions. The committee shall mediate, gather information, offer counsel, and make recommendations to the president of the institution where appropriate. As a hearing board, the Faculty Welfare Committee shall not have the authority to overturn decisions previously made.

In all cases, the faculty member concerned will be provided with the results of the committee’s deliberations and the reasons for the committee’s recommendations.

For the purposes of this committee’s deliberation, a grievance shall be defined as an allegation of substantive error of procedures or of due process of law. Mere disagreement with the recommendation of the University Committee on Promotions, the provost, or the decision of the president of the institution shall not in and of itself alone be considered a grievance.

An allegation of unlawful discrimination based arbitrarily upon race, color, national origin, sex, age, marital status or handicap shall be handled through grievance procedures for faculty.

Procedure:

When a faculty member feels that they have just cause for a grievance, once promotion and/or merit pay decisions have been made, the faculty member may contact the chair of the Faculty Welfare Committee. Upon consultation with the faculty member, the chair may then convene the committee to hear the faculty member’s case.

If, in the opinion of the committee, no just grievance exists or the case reaches beyond the purview of the Faculty Welfare Committee, the committee may recommend to the faculty member concerned other avenues of appeal.

If, the committee elects to pursue the matter, it may meet with the department chair and/or provost in cases of merit pay and promotion decisions to mediate and gather information. In exceptional cases concerning promotion, the Faculty Welfare Committee may also meet with the University Committee on Promotions in its mediation efforts. The Faculty Welfare Committee will then decide as to whether, in its opinion, the faculty member’s grievance is warranted or not. This decision will be forwarded to the president of the institution who will make a final decision using, among other information at his disposal, the information and recommendation of the Faculty Welfare Committee.

Except as stated above, the Faculty Welfare Committee’s deliberations as a grievance hearing board will remain strictly confidential. 

Appendix F Sample Memorandum of Professional Expectation for Full-Time Contractual Faculty

The following is language representative of topics covered in a Memorandum of Professional Expectation for FT-NTT faculty.

MEMORANDUM OF PROFESSIONAL EXPECTATIONS

The ___________________department/program has requested your appointment to a Full-Time, Non-Tenure Track Faculty Position for ___________________Academic Year(s). The offer of an appointment is only for the stated academic year(s). Please note: there is no guarantee of an appointment renewal beyond each one-year period, as any possible renewal of appointment is based on the needs of the department and the overall positive performance review of the Appointee.

  • The teaching assignment is as follows:
  • Indicate reason(s) for teaching less than 24 credit hours/28 contact hours:
  • Your responsibilities as a(n) Click or tap here to enter text. are as follows:
  • Additional Expectations/Information:

 

Appendix LIB-B Criteria for Rank, Promotion, Permanent Status Review

The following sections outline the criteria for rank, promotion, permanent status, and post-permanent-status review for library faculty. Every candidate is expected to demonstrate work in support of diversity and inclusion in at least one of the categories with increasing weight being given to broader diversity activity.

Job Performance

Every candidate is expected to demonstrate competence in their assigned areas of responsibility. Competence entails being responsible, accurate and punctual; organizing work and completing tasks promptly; writing and speaking well; having a professional attitude; showing responsiveness to criticism; working effectively with patrons, colleagues, and staff and working collaboratively with other constituencies; and supporting the mission of the SU Libraries and the University. Annual performance reviews provide a key element in the determination of the candidate’s level and quality of job performance. Among the criteria to be considered are (in order of increasing weight):

  • ongoing professional reading
  • successful completion of basic assignments
  • thoroughness in executing projects
  • proactively sharing information with staff/colleagues (electronically, meetings, reports)
  • acceptance and successful completion of assignments of increasing complexity
  • sound, professionally informed judgment in offering/managing library services/resources
  • collaborating with staff, colleagues, University departments and constituencies, and other libraries
  • accepting new duties
  • application of new job skills
  • taking initiative to identify library needs and problems
  • thoroughly researching innovative ideas and possible enhancements to existing operations
  • consistently excellent performance
  • mentoring new librarians expertly
  • providing active leadership
  • introducing/implementing/maintaining new services/operations

Service 

The quality and extent of service on committees and of service to the external community merit consideration, in that order. Such service may be unrelated to an individual’s primary area of responsibility, but must reflect the values and mission of the University. While all committee service is important, increased weight accrues to geographic level (local, regional, state, national, and international); to scope (internal library, University, and professional); to degree of participation or leadership (member, chair); and to level of assignments or activities (nominating tasks, revising documents, conference planning, etc.). Among the criteria to be considered are (in order of increasing weight):

  • fulfilling basic obligations of attendance/participation
  • chairing a committee (internal, University, local, state, regional, national and/or international)
  • performing voluntary administrative duties
  • standing for election (local, state, regional, national and/or international)
  • completion of and quality, level, and scope of assignments
  • principal responsibility for planning a conference (local, state, regional, national and/or international)

Professional Development/Achievement

Candidates are expected to be dedicated to scholarly pursuits and to be professionally active as evidenced by scholarly contributions in their area(s). Scholarship includes original contributions to relevant disciplines, and may include forms such as engaged scholarship, entrepreneurial projects, interdisciplinary research, and any other forms that may develop, regardless of the medium of publication or execution. The non-exhaustive list of examples below are ordered on the basis of movement from a local audience to a national audience or from the inception to the completion of a project. Examples in each category include (in order of increasing weight):

Publications

  • book reviews (local, regional, national publications)
  • articles (length; local, regional, national publications; peer review, including open access)
  • chapters
  • journals, editorship
  • books

Presentations

  • panel discussion participation at internal, local, state, regional and national meetings and conferences
  • workshops/papers/presentations to the University and/or local, state, regional, national, or international conferences/meetings

Grantsmanship

  • identifying appropriate funding sources
  • contributing select portions to grant proposals
  • developing ideas that match funding source interests
  • writing grants
  • serving as a principal investigator for a grant
  • receiving grant awards

Advanced Study

  • workshops attended (length, relevance to position)
  • conferences attended
  • courses taken (relevance to position)
  • certificates earned
  • research in the field
  • advanced degrees earned

Awards

  • local (relevance to position)
  • regional, state, national, and/or international

Other Creative Activities (not in weighted order)

  • exhibits
  • performances
  • demonstrations
  • other creative activities

 

Appendix LIB-C Dossier Contents and Responsibilities

The following guidance is for library faculty.

A. Items to be supplied by candidates applying for promotional/permanent status/post-permanent-status-year review are listed. Candidates will submit materials through Salisbury University’s online system.

1. Curriculum Vitae should be dated, accurate, current, and present a portrait of the candidate’s accomplishments in as concise a manner as possible. To aid the LFPRC, it should include the following information: 

  1. Personal Information. This should include name, current rank, and educational background (including institutions, dates, degrees and continuing education activities).
  2. Employment history (in chronological order). Employment background information should include sufficient textual content to describe levels of professional competence.
  3. Service. For each organization or committee, include the full name of the organization or committee, the term of service, and offices held. If applicable, briefly mention contribution to significant projects.

1.library

2.campus

3.professional

4.community (mission-related)

5.service awards and honors

  1. Research, Scholarly and Creative Activities

    1. publications (in-house articles, web pages, book reviews, handbooks, on-line tutorials, and editorships; local, state, regional, national and international book reviews, articles, chapters, editorships, books)

    2. workshops attended, certificates earned, courses taken, degrees earned

    3. panel discussions (campus, USM, local, regional, state, national, international)

    4. workshops/papers/presentations delivered (campus, USM, local, regional, state, national, international)

    5. grants (partial or full responsibility, level of award, and amount of award)

    6. awards (campus, USM, local, regional, state, national, international)

    7. creative activities (exhibits, performances, demonstrations, other creative activities)

2. Candidate’s Promotion/Permanent Status/Post-Permanent-Status Review Statement 

The promotion, permanent status, or post-permanent-status review statement should describe the candidate’s accomplishments during the review period in each of the three general areas described in Appendix LIB-B. In addition, candidates are expected to discuss how their work has advanced or supported diversity and inclusion. Candidates are encouraged to refer to the specific criteria listed in each category. The statement should address the ways in which candidates have met the requirements for the rank being sought, the awarding of permanent status, or, in the case of post-permanent-status reviews, the rank already held. The statement should focus on achievements and should provide a picture of career development, accomplishments, and aspirations.

The review period is that period of time since:

  1. for promotion, initial appointment or a candidate’s last promotion
  2. for permanent status, initial appointment
  3. for post-permanent-status review, the awarding of permanent status or the previous post-permanent-status review.

3.  Transcript(s)

Original transcript(s) documenting any formal continuing studies during the review period.

4.  Publications

Copies of up to three professionally relevant publications and title pages of others.

5. Service

Merely listing membership in committees is not sufficient. Please provide enough information to indicate your contributions and accomplishments on the committees.

6.  Other  

Candidates may submit any other materials concerning their professional capabilities or accomplishments that support the application for promotion or permanent status or the post-permanent-status review. These might include representative examples of scholarship/creative work, evaluations of candidates’ work from users/faculty/associates, and data/analysis relating to professional activities.

B.  Items to be supplied by others during the course of promotional/permanent status/post-permanent-status review:

  1. Current position description to be updated as necessary by supervisors and candidates and uploaded to the online system by the Dean of Libraries & Instructional Resources.
  2. Performance evaluations

For promotions, copies of the six most recent annual evaluations since the last promotion; if a candidate has not been employed long enough to have had six evaluations, then all evaluations since their start date shall be added. For permanent status, copies of the most recent annual evaluations since start date or promotion. For post-permanent status review, copies of the five most recent annual evaluations since the last post-permanent status review or the awarding of permanent status. The Dean of Libraries & Instructional Resources will upload these evaluations.

3.  Letter of Reference from the supervisor, plus, for promotion or permanent status, two additional letters of reference. If so desired, the candidate may supply additional letters of reference beyond the first two.  The additional letters of reference should be sent to the Dean of Libraries & Instructional Resources for uploading.

4.  Other

Any additional information from inside and outside the Libraries in order to complete the documentation needed to make recommendations.

5.  Recommendations and Actions

  1. for promotion and permanent status, letter conveying decision of LFPRC supplied by LFPRC Chair
  2. for promotion and permanent status, decision of Dean of Libraries & Instructional Resources 
  3. for promotion and permanent status, decision of Provost or designee
  4. for permanent status review, recommendations of the supervisor and the Dean of Libraries & Instructional Resources

 

Appendix LIB-D: Calendar of Key Dates for Library Faculty

Table 1. Key Dates for Promotion Review*

Date

Description
July 15 Dean of Libraries & Instructional Resources sends written or electronic notification to faculty at the rank of Librarian I who must undergo mandatory review for promotion after three full years of employment (see Section 3.A.2.)
December 1 Deadline for candidates to send written or electronic notification to Dean of Libraries & Instructional Resources of intent to apply for promotion.
January 8 Deadline for uploading applications for promotion in Salisbury University’s online system.
January 15     

Deadline for upload of supervisors’ letters of reference in the online system.

Deadline for submission of any other letters of reference to the Dean of Libraries & Instructional Resources.

January 18 Deadline for Dean of Libraries & Instructional Resources to upload position description, letters of reference, and previous evaluations in the online system.
February 15  Deadline for LFPRC to request any additional information from the candidates.
February 22 Deadline for candidates to upload any additional information requested by the LFPRC.
March 1 LFPRC uploads its letter on its decision to recommend or not recommend candidates for promotion.
March 8 Candidates through the online system signify their intention to move forward or to withdraw application by this date.
March 22 Dean of Libraries & Instructional Resources uploads letter with Dean’s decision to recommend or not recommend candidate for promotion by this date.
April 1 Candidates through the online system signify their intention to move application forward to Provost or withdraw application by this date.
May 1 Provost uploads recommendations for the President by this date.
May 15 President notifies candidates in writing of promotion decision by this date.
June 1 Provost’s Office uploads the president’s letter in the online system and archives the file.

*Exception: If also applying for permanent status, follow the timeline in Table 2. If the LFPRC recommendation for promotion is positive, then permanent status will also be recommended unless conditions in 2.B. preclude such a recommendation.

 

Table 2. Key Dates for Permanent Status Review

Date Description
July 15 Dean of Libraries & Instructional Resources sends written or electronic notification to librarians who must undergo mandatory review for permanent status (see Section 4.B.).
September 1 Deadline for uploading applications for permanent status in Salisbury University’s online system.
September 8

Deadline for upload of supervisors’ letters of reference in the online system.

Deadline for submission of any other letters of reference to the Dean of Libraries & Instructional Resources.

September 11

Deadline for Dean of Libraries & Instructional Resources to upload position description, letters of reference, and previous evaluations in the online system.

October 1

Deadline for LFPRC to request any additional information from the candidates.
October 8 Deadline for candidates to upload any additional information requested by the LFPRC.

October 15

LFPRC uploads its letter on its decision to recommend or not recommend candidates for permanent status.
October 22 Candidates through the online system signify their intention to move forward or to withdraw application by this date.
November 7 Dean of Libraries & Instructional Resources uploads letter with Dean’s decision to recommend or not recommend candidates for permanent status by this date.
November 14 Candidates through the online system signify their intention to move application forward to Provost or withdraw application by this date.

December 15

Provost uploads recommendations for the President by this date.

January 15

President notifies candidates in writing of permanent status decision by this date.

February 1

Provost’s Office uploads the president’s letter in the online system and archives the file.


Table 3. Key Dates for Post-Permanent-Status Review of Library Faculty

Date Description
July 15 Dean of Libraries & Instructional Resources sends written notification to librarians who must undergo post-permanent-status review.
December 15 Deadline for librarians to upload post-permanent-status review materials (including any letters of reference other than from supervisors) in Salisbury University’s online system.
December 22 Dean of Libraries & Instructional Resources uploads position description and copies of the five most recent annual evaluations since the last post-permanent status review or the awarding of permanent status.
February 1 Deadline for supervisors to upload their reviews in the online system.
March 1

Deadline for Dean of Libraries & Instructional Resources to upload the Dean’s review in the online system.

March 8 Deadline for candidates to respond, if desired, to supervisors’ and Dean’s evaluations.
March 15

Dean of Libraries & Instructional Resources archives the file.

 

 

 

Appendix M: Establishing Departmental Committees for Promotion and Tenure

Each academic department in the schools of the university will select a review committee to assist in the evaluation of its faculty for promotion and a review committee to assist in the evaluation of its faculty for tenure. Review committees for promotion will consist of at least three members who are at or above the rank for which the applicant is applying. Review committees for tenure will also consist of at least three members and each of these must themselves be tenured faculty in the university.

The manner of the selection of faculty for review committees will be determined by the faculty members in each department. Each department will determine procedures for committee establishment and the rules and procedures by which review committees will operate, and will provide these in writing to all faculty in the department, the department chair, the dean of the school and the provost.

Faculty from other departments who meet the necessary qualifications may be invited to participate on review committees if the department, the faculty member, or the academic administration determines it is desirable. Where the participation of such faculty is viewed as necessary but cannot be agreed upon by the faculty member, the department, the department chair or the dean and the provost will develop a list of three names of individuals qualified to serve on the review committee and those in disagreement will have three working days in which to select an individual from the list. If a name cannot be selected within three working days, the provost will select from the list the individual who will serve on the review committee.

Faculty members may not serve as committee members on their own review committees nor may the members of their immediate families (wives, husbands, children, parents, parents-in-law, sisters, brothers, sisters-in-law, or brothers-in-law) serve as members on their review committees.

Revised 2/20/02, 9/03

 

Salisbury University Faculty Handbook ©